Titanic at 100 years

The story of this ship will always float.  And no berg of any sort will threaten to sink that.  But it merely floats, and has no recognizable destination at the moment.  I'm now curious about its future stopovers, especially how the hyper-active imagination of literature and film can reshape that narrative into their own terms.  So far, the love-affair of nostalgia and curiosity in this story has been steamy.  James Cameron exposed that into a highly marketable commodity.  But love-affairs have definite life-spans.  Usually, they're short.  Although 'short', in this regard, could be highly elastic.  Let's see.  Another two centuries?  That's short in terms of light years.  The future could further exhume the remains of that ship, and raise it using technology we can only imagine today.

[The images above are linked from The Boston Globe. ]

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